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CASE REPORT
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 132-134

A rare case of caudal regression syndrome linked to tethered cord and dermal cysts


1 Resident, Department of Neurological Surgery, Central Military Hospital Nueva Granada Military University, Bogotá, Colombia
2 Neurosurgeon, Department of Neurological Surgery, Central Military Hospital Nueva Granada Military University, Bogotá, Colombia
3 Medical Student, Medical School, Nueva Granada Military University, Bogotá, Colombia

Correspondence Address:
Claudia Marcela Restrepo
Resident, Department of Neurological Surgery, Central Military Hospital Nueva Granada Military University, Bogotá
Colombia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1030

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Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by agenesis of the vertebral bodies of the lumbosacral spine associated with other malformations of the pelvis and inferiors limbs. We present a case of a 18 months boy referred to Central Military Hospital (Bogotá, Colombia) with sacrococcygeal fistula and a permanent hip abduction brace. On physical examination, there was an abnormal palpation of the sacral hiatus and coccyx. His hips were flexed and abducted, but did not have contractures. Neurological examination and psychomotor development were normal. In lumbar MRI, there were found hypoplasia of the sacrum and agenesis of the coccyx with a large subcutaneous and spinal lipoma, tethered spinal cord, and two dermal tracts at the level of L4 and S3 vertebrae. Somatosensory evoked potentials with latency and amplitude within normal ranges. Because of this, operation was not considered.


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