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CASE REPORT
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 58-60

Isolated giant cell tumor of the lumbar spine


1 Lecturer, Department of Orthopedic, Chandulal Chandrakar Hospital and Medical College, Bhilai, Chhattisgarh, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, Chandulal Chandrakar Hospital and Medical College, Bhilai, Chhattisgarh, India
3 Associate Professor, Department of Orthopedic, Chandulal Chandrakar Hospital and Medical College, Bhilai, Chhattisgarh, India
4 Assistant professor, Department of Orthopedic, Chandulal Chandrakar Hospital and Medical College, Bhilai, Chhattisgarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Ankit Arunbhai Desai
Lecturer, Department of Orthopedic, Chandulal Chandrakar Hospital and Medical College, Bhilai, Chhattisgarh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1058

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Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are benign tumors of the bone that most commonly occur at the ends of the long bones; they are rarely found in the spine above the sacrum. The management of patients with GCTs of the spine represents a challenge, and the clinical approach to this problem continues to evolve with improvements in surgical and adjunctive therapies. Giant cell tumor is a rare bone tumor seen in 3 to 5% of primary bone neoplasm. Approximately, 7% of GCTs are found in the vertebral column. Giant cell tumors of the spine are found in only 5 to 7% of cases and can occur in any region of the spine but are believed to be predominantly in the sacrum. Despite its benign nature, expansion in a confined space makes early detection of spinal GCTs important to prevent occurrence of compressive myelopathy/radiculopathy. Although complete en bloc surgical resection is difficult in the spine, treatment with adjuvant radiotherapy has been considered controversial because of a small risk of malignant transformation. We are reporting a cases of GCTs in the lumbar vertebrae that were treated successfully with surgical excision, decompression and as well as follow-up.


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